Redistribution Isn’t Enough

Imagine for a moment that you and a group of strangers are asked to design a set of rules that will govern the city that you live in. Except there’s a catch: while deciding on these rules you don’t know whether you’ll be rich or poor; young or old; able bodied or disabled; smart or not; black, white, male, female, gay, straight, etc. In other words, you know nothing about what your circumstances will be when you emerge from your deliberations.

Hunting for a sense of community in Hunters Point

Sitting outside of Cantina, a Mexican restaurant in the Hunters Point area of Long Island City, yesterday, I stared at the glass towers and wide side walks around me. I took in the street-level retail -- a handful of restaurants and a coffee shop -- and noted the playing fields in the middle of it all. I watched as masked couples pushed strollers by... The neighborhood felt soulless and I was struggling to put my finger on why.

Towards social policy rooted in social networks (the IRL kind)

It's 2059. The results of a study on the ability of genetic engineering to help poor kids escape poverty are out and they're not pretty. It turns out that even a high IQ can't overcome structural inequality. Or, at least that's the scenario presented as part of a new oped series from the Times, which … Continue reading Towards social policy rooted in social networks (the IRL kind)

Journal News (LoHud.com): What We Can Learn From Peekskill’s Revival

Originally Published in The Journal News (LoHud.com), Friday, May 24, 2019. Let me start with a confession: I haven’t lived in the lower Hudson Valley for the past 10 years. But my parents still do. And every time I’m back to visit, I can’t get over the transformation in the river towns, particularly Peekskill, near … Continue reading Journal News (LoHud.com): What We Can Learn From Peekskill’s Revival